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REVIEW: Minari

A24
Rated: PG-13
Runtime: 115 minutes
Director: Lee Isaac Chung

Minari (미나리), which literally translates to “water dropwort” is a drama film written and directed by Lee Isaac Jeong. It stars Steven Yeun, Han Ye-ri, Alan Kim, Noel Kate Cho, Youn Yuh-jung, and Will Patton. It is a semi-autobiographical take on Chung’s upbringing where a family of South Korean immigrants try to make it in rural America during the 1980s.

This film takes inspiration from the Bible, of a family trying to find a new life. In the old testament, the Hebrews left Egypt as “strangers and exiles on the earth and were seeking a homeland,” and they were immigrants coming into the promised land, and the Yi family is no different. Jacob and his family traveled from California to Arkansas to start their own garden/farm. His wife, Monica, wants the family to do well; especially for David, their son (Kim), who has a heart murmur. Their views coexist, but do clash when certain things happen that may or may not put the family at risk. To be successful in this new land, he has to make choices and deal with the consequences; whether that be joy, pain, laughter, or heartbreak.

Chung’s direction is able to accurately capture what some immigrants have to go through when they come to the United States. Even if one does not connect with the religious aspects or the immigrant aspects of the film, the film taps into what almost every human does, restlessly seeking for that sense of belonging. As humans, we are looking for the perfect job, the friend group, the people that accept us who we are and help us succeed. People may not always get along but good people that push through the differences will endure. Eventually, Monica’s widowed mother, Soonja (Yuh-Jung Youn) comes to live with them. Yuh-Jung is so good the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress seems well within her reach. She is dramatic when she needs to be, and her comedic timing was on point, though unexpected. Yuh-Jung has to flip back and forth and she does that fantastically well. Both Yeun give strong but vulnerable performances as the parental figures and Kim is adorably wonderful as David. Not only is David basically the director’s point of view, he ends up being the one that the audience follows even if they are not an immigrant or Asian themselves. David is an Americanized child and is always on the outside looking in. He does not know the struggles that his parents are going through as a lot of non-immigrants do not understand about immigrant families.

Alan Kim and Steven Yeun appear in a scene of Minari | A24, 2021.

Even when this film does show how racism does exist with the many Americans around the Yi family, Chung simply shows this as part of the family’s journey. Their journey is about a family trying to make it in a place that some would say they do not belong in. Chung then shows the immigrant experience of learning to assimilate but they also try to bring along the things that remind them of home. To the Yi family, it’s Minari.  When immigrants come to this country, there is always a conflict of the cultural aspect versus the new one that they are trying to assimilate into. Why would immigrants want to go somewhere where they are instantly put into an uphill battle? Because it’s worth it to make a better life for the next generation, and this is why this film is a beautiful representation of immigrant life. As the film shows, the Yi family goes through a rollercoaster of events and still endures.

Overall, Minari succeeds with its story, its acting, its message, its ending and some of its details.  The only small issue is that the film can feel a little slow at times. However, the ending is definitely worth it; it is about a family that asks for empathy without overdoing it with specific acting scenes. It’s not a political statement rather it’s only showing what humanity looks like. Watch it.

Recommendation: Go See It!

About the Author
I’m a simple guy who loves to watch and talk about movies. I go to the movies on holidays, weekends, and will even venture to the theaters by myself. I may have single handedly caused MoviePass to go under with how often I used it. Will you enjoy your time at the movies? Check out my reviews to find out!

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