Halloween

Shower Thoughts: Does ‘Psycho’ Still Hold Up 60 Years Later?

 Ha ha. Shower thoughts! Get it? Alright, alright; I’ll lay off the puns.

First Thoughts

 If you can believe it, there was a time when I wasn’t completely obsessed with movies. Back in high school, I took a “Literature Through Film” class as an excuse to watch movies as the class of the day. It was a chance for me to relax for an hour before going off to work. I remember when it was announced that we would be watching Psycho (1960), the principle of the school came in and assured us that even though this movie was rated R, there was nothing in this movie that would violate our cultural religious beliefs. However, if anyone felt uncomfortable, the teacher would provide an alternative assignment. (I grew up in a very conservative part of Utah) No one took the alternative, and I myself was super excited to see a real life, unedited rated R movie! (Once again, I was really conservative growing up.) When the credit rolled, I found myself with a deep sense of…boredom. Despite being in a film class, I had not begun to appreciate all the nuances and technical aspects that comes with filmmaking. I had expected a lot more shocking visuals and graphic violence to accompany the movie regarded as the greatest thriller/slasher film ever made. In my youthful arrogance and ignorance, I wrote off Psycho as being overrated and was determined to leave it at that. Thankfully, I grew up.

My Redemption Arc

It was around 2014 when I discovered my love for watching and collecting movies, and around the fall of 2015 when I first began seriously studying film as a medium. I took an introduction to film class with my roommate, and I began really appreciating what goes into making a film. I began to expand my watch-list beyond the bi-annual Disney and Marvel movies, getting into more independent films and familiarizing myself with different directors. About a year later, I realized that I still had neglected a whole genre: horror. I had always been a bit apprehensive about horror film because of my conservative upbringing, but I also knew I wouldn’t be a very good film critic if I refused to watch an entire genre. So I began to ask around to see what the best horror movies were. I slowly began to really appreciate and admire horror as a genre simply by how much effort it takes to create a good horror picture. Cheap B-horror movies are a dime a dozen, and I can’t tell you how great it is to see a fantastic horror movie. Fast forward to a couple of weeks ago, when the Backseat Directors writers were having a group discussion about critically acclaimed movies that were overrated (in contrast to our “Defend Your Movies” series on the podcast). I threw out that I thought Psycho was boring, and the gasps of outrage and disbelief could be heard throughout the far reaches of space. André (the founder of Backseat Directors) brought up the suggestion that I should watch it again and see how I feel about it now. Knowing that my knowledge of movies had grown, and I’d probably have a different opinion now, I agreed. So, what’s my verdict? Psycho is a masterpiece.

Surprise vs Suspense

Vera Miles as Lila Crane in the iconic “shower scene” of Psycho (1960) | Paramount Pictures.

Many fans of Hitchcock are likely familiar with his famous advice about surprise vs suspense:

There is a distinct difference between “suspense” and “surprise,” and yet many pictures continually confuse the two. I’ll explain what I mean

We are now having a very innocent little chat. Let’s suppose that there is a bomb underneath this table between us. Nothing happens, and then all of a sudden, “Boom!” There is an explosion. The public is surprised, but prior to this surprise, it has seen an absolutely ordinary scene, of no special consequence. Now, let us take a suspense situation. The bomb is underneath the table and the public knows it, probably because they have seen the anarchist place it there. The public is aware the bomb is going to explode at one o’clock and there is a clock in the decor. The public can see that it is a quarter to one. In these conditions, the same innocuous conversation becomes fascinating because the public is participating in the scene. The audience is longing to warn the characters on the screen: “You shouldn’t be talking about such trivial matters. There is a bomb beneath you and it is about to explode!

In the first case we have given the public fifteen seconds of surprise at the moment of the explosion. In the second we have provided them with fifteen minutes of suspense. The conclusion is that whenever possible the public must be informed. Except when the surprise is a twist, that is, when the unexpected ending is, in itself, the highlight of the story.

TV interview with Alfred Hitchcock

One thing that plagues a lot of modern horror/slasher films is the over use of jump scares, and the lack of suspense building. They tend to go for the surprise angle and not the suspense. For some movies, that’s completely fine. However, an over reliance on suspense over surprise actually cheapens the quality of the film. This is the reason the original Halloween (1978) was such a success. It wasn’t as bloody or gory as most modern movies, and even the Halloween sequels themselves. But the constant stress of waiting and not knowing what the killer was going to do next kept us on the edge of our seats. I believe this drew its inspiration from Psycho.

“Re Re Re Re”

Anthony Perkins as Norman Bates in one of the most iconic scenes in film history | Psycho (1960) | Paramount Pictures.

The music of Psycho is the heart and soul of the movie. Hitchcock even admitted that without the music, he was convinced that Psycho would be doomed to be a made-for-TV movie. However, after seeing the film with the finished score, he was confident in the film.

Going back to my comparisons with the original Halloween… in both films, the music elevated what could have been a B-movie into a masterpiece. Both had great themes and haunting melodies that accompanied the sense of being watched and stalked.

Anthony Perkins

I just want to acknowledge how outstanding Anthony Perkins’ performance is in this movie. When we first meet Norman Bates, he seems like the perfect boy next door: a shy, but good natured man. Then slowly we learn that he is a peeping tom, and covers up for what he believes is his mother’s murders. The subtle change in his face and in his eyes over the course of the film is absolutely brilliant.

Final Thoughts

Back in high school I knew almost nothing about different types of movies, nor how they were made. In the words of my old boss at the movie theater, I was a “popcorn muncher.” Now, I totally understand why this movie is referred to as a classic and a masterpiece. Those terms are rightly used. It was because of Psycho that movies like Halloween could become so beloved. I’m so glad I watched this movie again. I own it now, and so should you.

REVIEW: Hubie Halloween

NETFLIX
Rated: PG-13
Run Time: 102 minutes
Director: Steven Brill

Anybody else just really loving this holiday season more than usual this year? I don’t know what it is, but I’m especially open to anything Halloween related just to get the spooky feels going. Haunted houses, late night movies in bed, decorating my classroom, scary stories around the fire–I’m doing it all this time around. Maybe that’s why I was actually willing to give Hubie Halloween a shot. My take on this film will end up being pretty simple, short and not so sweet. But I don’t feel like passing judgment without first honoring merit where merit is due. So, let me talk a little bit about the producer and lead actor.

Deep down, don’t we all love Adam Sandler? From The Wedding Singer (1998) to 50 First Dates (2004), he’s made some definite classics that will be in my movie collection forever. He has a respectable resume between SNL, his large filmography, and an underrated knack for drama like in Punch Drunk Love (2002), The Meyerowitz Stories (2017) and most recently, Uncut Gems (2019). It’s not very debatable, the guy has talent.

On top of his career, he just seems like a really good dude off the screen. I love the tear-jerking, heartwarmingly personal memorial he gave Chris Farley in Adam Sandler: 100% Fresh (2018). He performed a beautiful song with Miley Cyrus respecting the victims of the Las Vegas shooting a few years back. Even that funny video of him and Justin Bieber spotting each other on the streets; just a nice, down to earth human being.

Now I’ll add to the overwhelming consensus: he’s had a lot of duds. In many cases, his later movies have been almost entirely void of the sincerity, wit and utter watchability of his past films. I don’t think I need to name them, but basically any Happy Madison produced flick in the last 10 to 15 years should give you a general idea. This doesn’t mean that these movies don’t have a place in the world. Just as the gags have delved into potty-humor and the stories and characters have turned (even more) ridiculous, they may just be more so geared for preteens. So don’t call me a hater. And for the record, I love that he uses his films as a way to kind of vacation and spend time with his buddies. I’m also sure he works really hard; they usually pump out 2 or more movies a year.

Julie Bowen and Adam Sandler appear in a scene of Hubie Halloween | NETFLIX.

So… Hubie Halloween. I’ll say a couple things I loved. There were really fun references to older, far superior Adam Sandler movies. Moments of these are what got me first engaged in the film and what often got me through it. That element and just a few other subtle bits of dialogue had me genuinely laughing. Another thing, Sandler’s character is a sweet guy, and the moral of the story centers around that. Though many might be tired of the standard Bobby Boucher/Happy Madison/Sandy Wexler voice and mannerisms (and at first his voice did make me moan in exhaustion), it works fine enough to make the character overall likable.

BUT expect the bizarre, witless potty-humor. Expect other jokes that just simply fall flat. Expect less than award-worthy acting and a script and story that don’t help much either in bolstering this flick out of the slew of subpar Netflix Originals.

For many die hard fans of his content, or if some individuals are just that easily pleased by a movie, this may be a fun new addition for you. After all it’s Halloween genre. And in my opinion, that alone makes any movie more fun.

Aside from those select few mentioned, I’d advise the general audience to skip it for now. Keep an eye out on our content that has or will be released this month for some better suggestions of Halloween movie night options!

Recommendation: SKIP IT

31 Films for 31 Nights: Your Guide to the Spookiest and Scariest Films You Can Watch this October

Good evening foolish mortals! It is I, the grandmaster of ghouls Josh here to share with you 31 films that I personally will be watching this October. One horror film for every day of the month is my tradition and we will be going through old classics and modern terrors, a mix of mainstream and indie, and none of that fun family Halloween. This is pure screams and gore. So please, sit back, relax, and don’t look behind you….you might not like what’s there.

Oct. 1 – Midsommar: You might ask yourself, “What’s so scary about a fun festival that takes place in a constant daylight setting?” Ari Aster is ready to show you. Ambitious, disturbing, and excellently made, Midsommar is modern horror that must be seen.

Midsommar is available streaming on Amazon Prime Video.

Oct. 2 – The Wicker Man (1973): Keeping our theme of terrifying cults, The Wicker Man is ultimately a story of faith in God against the sinners, though the ending is not a victory.

The Wicker Man (1973) is available streaming on The Criterion Channel.

Oct. 3 – They Live: What I love about They Live is that it challenges modern media even in today’s current times. It’s a film about breaking the status quo and not falling for media deception. Very relevant for today.

They Live is available streaming on STARZ.

Oct. 4 – Se7en: “WHAT’S IN THE BOX?!” is one of my all time favorite lines in cinema and Se7en is one of my all time favorite detective films. What makes it so terrifying is how real the whole film feels, and a serial killer who is always one step ahead.

Se7en is available streaming on HBO Max.

Oct. 5 – The Conjuring: A movie that nails the “based on true events” theme that it is based on. James Wan excellently directs a fine period piece that is heavy on the scares.

The Conjuring is available to rent or purchase on most VOD services.

Oct. 6 – The Strangers: While not the strongest movie per se, what The Strangers does right is instill the fear in you that this could really happen to someone. Reckless violence is truly terrifying.

The Strangers is available streaming on SYFY.

Oct. 7 – Raw: This movie absolutely shocked me when I first saw it; a sweet girl who is a die-hard vegetarian finds out she has a penchant for the taste of flesh, while also discovering herself in college. What could go wrong?

Raw is available to rent or purchase on most VOD services.

Oct. 8 – Re-Animator: Based on the H.P. Lovecraft story, Re-Animator is loud, gory, and insane. A fun black comedy, yet also horrifying.

Re-Animator is available streaming in fuboTV and Showtime.

Oct. 9 – 28 Days Later: An excellent reimagining of the zombie genre. This movie will punch you in the face and never let up.

28 Days Later is available streaming on SYFY and sling.

Oct. 10 – The Babadook: Using the horror genre to explore how difficult motherhood can be sounds like a daunting task, but Jennifer Kent makes it look like a cakewalk. It balances tension and scares in a masterful way.

The Babadook is available to rent or purchase on most VOD services.

Oct. 11 – Don’t Look Now: A movie that strays away from a lot of the conventions of horror, but rather focuses on very human themes such as grief and the mental anguish one suffers. This movie changed the way I see horror and should not be missed.

Don’t Look Now is available streaming on Amazon Prime Video and The Criterion Channel.

Oct. 12 – The Descent: Claustrophobia mixed with creatures is always scary. This movie is nerve-wracking and intense, a payoff from its excellent direction and performances.

The Descent is available streaming on sling and tubi.

Oct. 13 – Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1992): My personal choice for a Dracula film. This movie is pure 90s, overblown, noisy, but ultimately gorgeous. The performances are excellent and what keeps me watching it every year.

Bram Stoker’s Dracula is available streaming on YuppTV and DirecTV.

Oct. 14 – Scream: Wes Craven not only helped create the horror genre but he also re-invented it. A very meta film that breaks all the rules. Scream may seem by the books now, but at the time this was a whole new ball game.

Scream is available to rent or purchase on most VOD services.

Oct. 15 – The Witch: A film that is an exercise in showing not telling. It’ll feed you little hints and details until it is too late. Thought provoking and masterfully made.

The Witch is available streaming on fuboTV and Showtime.

Oct. 16 – Bone Tomahawk: A genre mashup of western and horror is as appetizing as peanut butter and tuna. But Bone Tomahawk relishes in its disgustingness with disturbing visuals and intense gore. Not for the faint of heart.

Bone Tomahawk is available streaming on Amazon Prime Video.

Oct. 17 – Suspiria (1977): Italian director Dario Argento’s magnum opus, this is punk rock horror. One of the last films made in Technicolor the reds of the blood are intensely crimson, and the vibrant colors terrify the eyes.

Suspiria (1977) is available streaming on tubi.

Oct. 18 – Audition: If you have never seen this movie I highly suggest going in blind. If you have seen it then you know why. A total smoke and mirrors show that is also a pressure cooker that explodes in the nastiest way, Audition will leave you in total shock.

Audition is available streaming on SHUDDER and tubi.

Oct. 19 – Friday the 13th Part 2: I actually think that Part 2 is the best entry in the series, and is actually the film where Jason Voorhees is the primary villain. Gory, choppy, and brutal, what everyone loves on good ol Halloween.

Friday the 13th Part 2 is available streaming on sling.

Oct. 20 – A Dark Song: This little indie film is the very definition of a slow burn horror. Nothing but setup for what feels like an hour and you’re ready to give up. But if you stick through it you’ll witness a film that will chill you to the bone.

A Dark Song is available streaming on sling.

Oct. 21 – Lake Mungo: A ghost story in mockumentary form, Lake Mungo feels so real that you have no choice but to sympathize with the characters on screen. The power of this film is how tragic it is; it’s a feeling that stuck with me for weeks.

Laker Mungo is available streaming on Amazon Prime Video and tubi.

Oct. 22 – Martyrs (2008): This is probably the most controversial film on my list. A French shock film that pushes the absolute limits. I wish I could stick my brain in a dishwasher to take this film out of my memory.

Martyrs is available to rent or purchase on most VOD services.

Oct. 23 – The Blair Witch Project: This is seriously a once in a lifetime kind of film. While it feels tame by today’s standards, The Blair Witch Project has actually helped shaped the current landscape of film today. An absolute must see and horror classic.

The Blair Witch Project is available streaming on DirecTV and sling.

Oct. 24 – The Shining: My all time favorite Stephen King adaptation. Kubrick gives us a masterclass in storytelling, cinematography, and direction. With so much to learn and observe this is a film that requires multiple watches.

The Shining is available streaming on DirecTV and sling.

Oct. 25 – Psycho (1960): What can I say that hasn’t already been said about this film? A contribution to horror and proof that the genre itself is an art form.

Psycho is available streaming on peacock.

Oct. 26 – Candyman (1992): Taking place in a public housing project and featuring one of the most interesting horror movie villains around, Candyman isn’t your average slasher. It digs a little deeper to show a classist message that is still relevant.

Candyman (1992) is available streaming on DirecTV, fuboTV, and sling.

Oct. 27 – The Exorcist (1973): I’ve been frequently told by people that The Exorcist, “just isn’t scary anymore,” and I couldn’t disagree more. To this day and after several watches this movie still sends a chill up my spine. Its legacy is eternal.

The Exorcist (1973) is available streaming on DirecTV and sling.

Oct. 28 – The Thing: I love everything about this film, the paranoia, the terror, and the total feeling of freezing isolation. It also boasts some of the coolest special effects made practically. Its a real sucker punch of a film.

The Thing is available streaming on DirecTV and Showtime.

Oct. 29 – Get Out: One of the most important films of the 2010s and an insightful commentary on race relations, Get Out is a thriller where you don’t know whether you should be laughing or crying in fear, that’s what makes it scary.

Get Out is available to rent or purchase on most VOD services.

Oct. 30 – Alien: The very essence of Alien isn’t sci-fi but rather gothic horror. Carefully crafted by Ridley Scott, this movie is good not because of its complexity, but its lack of it. Being trapped in a giant tin can with that Alien will always be scary to me.

Alien is available streaming on DirecTV and HBO Max.

Oct. 31 – Halloween (1978): This is the movie I watch every single Halloween. I first saw it when I was a junior in high school and it affected me so much that I continue to watch it like some sort of sick ritual. Halloween is the horror genre distilled into a perfect formula.

Halloween (1978) is available streaming on The Roku Channel and on SHUDDER.

Well, there it is folks! This isn’t a list of what I think are the best horror movies, but rather a guide of movies that I think are fun to watch to get in the spooky mood during this festive month. There is a certain beauty in the Horror genre. Beneath all the blood and guts, the dirt and the grime, there is a certain catharsis that one feels after conquering a fear. It is a genre that is always innovating and always looking to evoke emotion. After all, what’s fun without a little fear? Happy Halloween!

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