Pixar

ROUNDTABLE RECOMMENDATIONS: A Look Back at Some of Our Favorite Movies of 2020

*Editor’s note: The year that seemed like it would never end has done the impossible… it’s actually over. 2020 has been a year unlike any other in our lifetime, and I think it’s safe to say that most of us are glad to see it go. Through it all, we have gained experiences and memories (both good and bad) that will shape our lives for years to come. Movies, and the lack thereof, might seem a trivial things when compared to the crushing challenges many faced in 2020; death, sickness, unemployment, school closures, social interactions etc. have all paid a heavy toll on societies around the world. Encouragement, hope, friendship and love are forms of strength that can be derived from stories, and as pillar of modern day storytelling, we want to share with you which movies we fell in love with in 2020 and wholeheartedly recommend to you. Enjoy!

André Hutchens: As bad as 2020 has been for the movie theater industry (and I only hope a speedy recovery for the industry), streaming services have never been more in demand. Lockdown mandates and social distancing policies have all but crippled movie theaters globally, but one industry’s tragedy is another industry’s triumph. And no streaming service has reaped the rewards more so than Netflix. With over 200 million subscribers worldwide, Netflix is the King of streaming, and continued its dominance in 2020… which is where I will pull my movie recommendation. Hillbilly Elegy tells the true story of real working class Americans and their struggle for survival in towns long forgotten by the broader public. You’ll see lives and relationships shredded by drug addiction, the struggle of single parents trying to play the part meant for two, and how life can feel hopeless when you’re drowning in life’s struggles. But the reason why I am recommending this film isn’t for the depiction of real life struggles, but for how the characters are able to overcome them. With the help of family, the power of forgiveness, and the guiding hand of faith, Hillbilly Elegy will show every viewer the possibilities of a better life when you begin to take responsibility for it. Easily my favorite movie of the year, I unequivocally recommend watching Hillbilly Elegy on Netflix.

CJ Marshall: Pixar has maintained such a high standard over the years. Their projects are mostly varying degrees of “Good” rather than good or bad. Soul is no different. The film already had wit, charm, and an authentic Black culture flavor coursing through its veins (Spider-verse anyone?) Who could know what significance its message would carry going into a year like the one just past? Soul carries that added weight because of how sturdy Pixar built its foundation. It should rightfully take its place as one of the jewels in the Pixar crown. My single regret is that I couldn’t see this film on the big screen in 3D.

Parker Johnson: 2020 was a tough year for all of us, and The Personal History of David Copperfield was a perfect, charming movie to come out during this trying time. Dev Patel shines as David Copperfield, and this colorful cast brought this delightful pseudo-biopic of Charles Dickens to life in such a heartfelt way. Like Little Women (2019) and Emma. (2020) before it, The Personal History of David Copperfield was a perfect blend of wit, charm, and warmth that should delight anyone… as long as you don’t confuse it for David Copperfield the magician, like my mom did.

Rachel Ogden: The near impossible task for sequels is to find a way to provide the protagonist with new obstacles and growth without losing the character’s identity that made them cheer-worthy in the first place; in essence, changing the character without changing the character. Though it will draw dissent, I say Wonder Woman 1984 does this perfectly. Gal Gadot continues to amaze as a dynamic woman and superhero that even villains want to be like. The movie’s 150-something minutes follow three different character arcs that are integrated into a simple yet powerful plot that I found both well-written and engaging. What does it mean to be great? Both the message and material of the film serve as a satisfying answer, even if it’s not a popular one. Don’t let the haters get you down.

Rachel Wagner: Tomm Moore is perhaps the most consistent and underrated director working today. He already had triumphs in The Secret of the Kells and Song of the Sea and now he dazzles audiences once again with Wolfwalkers. Not only is the 2D animation beautiful but the story of 2 girls coming to understand their connection and who they are rings true. I love the way Moore weaves in his Irish lore into his stories without feeling the need to over-explain what is happening. We are charmed by both girls and that’s enough to get us invested in whatever fantastical challenges and adventures come their way. I also loved the music by Bruno Coulais and Kila. It all combines to make a special film that we are not likely to forget. Watch Wolfwalkers on Apple TV+ as soon as you can!

Sam Cooley: What’s crazy about The Invisible Man (2020) is that it came out before COVID blew up, but it still came and went nearly… invisible to audiences. But it is so deserving of all the attention and praise it can get. Between a chillingly unique premise of abuse and deception, subtle works in suspense and terror, and another expert, almost exhaustive performance from Elisabeth Moss, this is confidently endorsed as one of the best films of the year. Though its namesake is a classic, the most it has on the 2020 version is originality, but even then, 2020’s new and fresh version still approaches surprisingly close in that regard.

Shay Satmary: Palm Springs was definitely the movie of 2020 that I told everyone I know to watch immediately after I watched it. It’s one of those movies where the less you know about the plot, the better it is to watch. What you do need to know is that it does a cracking job of summing up the feelings and aesthetics of most people’s 2020. It also stars a hot, understated Andy Samberg, à la Celeste & Jesse Forever,  and Cristin Milioti from Black Mirror. Along with invoking specific 2020 feelings and wonderful acting, Palm Springs will make you laugh out loud, and if you’re a sucker like me, you’ll end up crying too. 

The Formal Review: Research has shown that there is an appeal of rewatching movies because of the familiarity of characters, settings and plots–and Tenet exemplifies this. Nolan uses numerous scientific theories, and the ROTAS palindromic square, in a very ambitious and ingenious way. He is able take those ideas and stage them via action sequences that run backward and forward through time simultaneously. Yes, it will require multiple viewings, but that is in no way a bad thing. Each time will allow for new details to be discovered and will increase the appreciation for this movie. It is in the top tier of Nolan films. Complex? …sure, but phenomenal as well.

Thank you for your support of Backseat Directors this last year. It ended up not being the most ideal year to launch our new movie website, but we’ve made it out alive! May this new year be better than the last. Happy 2021, everyone!

ROUNDTABLE REVIEW: Soul

*Editor’s note: Amidst the coronavirus pandemic of 2020, Disney made a bold move and decided to release the newest Pixar animated movie on their streaming service, Disney+. Pixar’s Soul debuted worldwide (where Disney+ is available) on Christmas Day. Unlike Disney’s Mulan (2020), Soul was available to any Disney+ subscriber at no additional charge, thank goodness! Whereas Mulan was part of the Disney+ Premier Access; meaning, if you wanted to watch Mulan at the time of its release, you would have to pay a rental fee of $29.99 on top of your subscription fees. We’ll see if Disney uses that same strategy with other movies that might debut on their new, shiny streaming platform… (hopefully not!).

Walt Disney Studios | Rated: PG | Runtime: 101 minutes | Director: Pete Docter

Shay Satmary: Soul ticks every Pixar box for me: great music, groundbreaking animation, complex characters and a deep meaning. Both, the jazz songs by Jon Batiste, and the other instrumental scores by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross do an amazing job of transporting you into the different settings of the film. The animation of the physical world captures the characters’ details and uniqueness. The way the spiritual world was animated–from the way the colors kaleidoscope through the light to the linear figures of the counselor characters–left me in absolute awe. Joe Gardner is a humble main character with relatable problems (maybe not the dying part and trying to make it back to your body) that helped me feel attached to his journey.  I have watched it twice now and with each viewing I was moved to tears. The magical thing Pixar does so well is leave you thinking about their films long after you complete them, and Soul is no exception.

Recommendation: STREAM IT

Parker Johnson: I think we are all in agreement when we say that Pixar is one of the giants in the animation industry, and that it is due to their ability to tell a deep, rich, emotional compelling story that resonates with both young kids, and their parents alike–taking a deep, core concept like feelings, grief, or passion and making it kid friendly. Soul has all these elements, but is geared toward more older kids and adults, and in doing so solidifies itself as a different kind of Pixar masterpiece. The animation is still stunning (with the abstract worlds of the Great Before and the “in between” being especially beautiful and stylistic), and there is still that classic Pixar playfulness, but the subject matter and themes of the movie are more mature and refined. I really appreciated that. It was like having your first sip of sparkling cider after only drinking grape juice your entire childhood. Soul moved me deeply, and made me want to live a better and more purposeful life. I think it deserves to be ranked among Pixar’s greatest.

Recommendation: STREAM IT

Rachel Wagner: Soul is a bold, ambitious film from director Pete Docter that I appreciate more than I love. I am grateful to the team at Disney Pixar for taking such a risk and making a beautifully animated interesting film that makes you think about the questions of life, and what price we are willing to pay to chase the dream. However, the script gets a little lost particularly in the middle section involving a cat. I also think the movie keeps us at a distance, and definitely keeps children at a distance, when with a few changes it could be more accessible. All of these choices impact the pacing and impact of the message. Nevertheless, it is refreshing to have such an experimental film come from a major studio, and if it doesn’t 100% deliver it gives the viewer a lot to think about along the way.

Recommendation: STREAM IT

Sam Cooley: Soul doesn’t have the exceptional wit nor the near airtight writing that is found in several other Pixar movies. However, I would recommend that anyone watch this film due to its sweetness, warmth and importance alone.

Recommendation: STREAM IT

The Formal Review: This movie is amazing, story wise and visually. The characters are engaging, the environments realistic and fantastical all at once, and most of all, it hits on an emotional level. There’s a gorgeously animated scene that perfectly captures what it feels like to get lost in the zone. However, the film does not seem to emphasize death outside of the fact that it happens. One of the main characters, 22 (voiced by Tina Fey), could also have been looked at a little deeper, which would have had a more emotional moment. While the message is understood to be along the lines of getting to know someone by walking in their shoes, I couldn’t help but think of 2017’s Get Out. Though not Pixar’s best film, Soul is good for a laugh, and it does have an emotional and enriching experience. The film does have a positive message about not taking your life for granted that ends up feeling satisfying in the end.

Recommendation: STREAM IT

BOX OFFICE BULLETIN: No Winners Here

Brothers Ian and Barley Lightfoot embark on an epic quest in search of a rare Phoenix Gem in Onward | PIXAR

The Hollywood box office just had its worst weekend total since 1990 (I really hated writing that sentence). And unfortunately, this might be the predominant Box Office Bulletin headline for the foreseeable future (I really don’t want to get used to that either…). As we move into discussing the box office numbers from movies this past weekend, keep in mind that every single movie currently in theaters is being impacted by Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), and the current global climate of self-isolation and social distancing will force these numbers into record lows.

As the reality of the COVID-19 pandemic begins to settle in, lives around the world are forced to adapt. It’s safe to say we would all prefer things to go back to what we call “normal” and for life to resume the way it was just a few weeks ago: but this is the new reality (for now), and adapting is something that humans do very well. We adapt, we move forward, we find ways to make the best of what life gives us. Rocky probably said it best when dealing with tough challenges in life:

“Let me tell you something you already know. The world ain’t all sunshine and rainbows. It’s a very mean and nasty place and I don’t care how tough you are it will beat you to your knees and keep you there permanently if you let it. You, me, or nobody is gonna hit as hard as life. But it ain’t about how hard ya hit. It’s about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward. How much you can take and keep moving forward. That’s how winning is done! Now if you know what you’re worth then go out and get what you’re worth. But ya gotta be willing to take the hits, and not pointing fingers saying you ain’t where you wanna be because of him, or her, or anybody! Cowards do that and that ain’t you! You’re better than that!”

– Rocky Balboa (2006) | MGM Distribution Co.

And with that, let’s get into some numbers.

Barley and Ian Lightfoot risk it all to spend one day with their dad in Onward | PIXAR

Pixar’s Onward captured this past weekend’s top spot by earning an additional $10.6 million at the domestic box office. Onward‘s global total has now reached $101 million. From week one to week two, Onward dropped 73% in its domestic earnings, becoming the steepest decline for any Pixar movie in its second weekend. The Good Dinosaur (2015) previously held that spot, dropping 61% in its second weekend, followed by Cars 2 (2011) dropping 60% in its second weekend. This is without a doubt a huge disappointment for Pixar and the filmmakers of Onward, as these numbers are no way reflective of the quality of the film.

Jeremy Camp (played by K.J. Apa) performs a song in I Still Believe | Lionsgate

In its opening weekend, faith-based film I Still Believe was able to gross $9.5 million domestically, coming in second just behind Onward. Lionsgate’s newest inspirational film did see a few international screens in Australia and New Zealand adding less than $300k to its box office totals. I Still Believe follows in the footsteps on another “true story” faith-based film distributed by Lionsgate called, I Can Only Imagine (2018) which grossed over $85 million total at the box office. Sadly, I don’t believe (pun absolutely intended) that I Still Believe will come close to making those kinds of numbers considering the current COVID-19 global climate.

Vin Diesel stars as Ray Garrison in Bloodshot | Sony Pictures

Sony Pictures’ Bloodshot takes third place for this past weekend’s box office. Bloodshot earned $9.1 million domestically, with an additional $15.1 million at the international box office. This is the lowest domestic opening weekend total for Vin Diesel since his 2015 film, The Last Witch Hunter. Even with current public gathering restrictions being implemented worldwide, Bloodshot debuted in 14 other countries, with Russia, Indonesia, and Mexico being the top three international markets. Vin Diesel stars in the lesser-known comic book adaptation from Valiant Comics as a technologically enhanced super-soldier named Ray Garrison. Bloodshot is the first of more Valiant Comics adaptations to come. Harbinger is the next slated adaption to hit theaters and is currently in development. Bloodshot earned a “B” from CinemaScore, while Rotten Tomatoes showed the common divide between that of critics and the general audience. The approval rating from critics is at 32% with 111 reviews at the time of writing this article, while the audience posted a 78% approval rating with 1,080 reviews.

Rounding out the top five of this past weekend’s box office are two films from Universal Pictures. In its third weekend The Invisible Man added $5.9 million to its domestic total, bringing its global box office total to $122.6 million. Kudos to Universal Pictures for instilling confidence back into the public that their iconic collection of ‘Classic Monsters’ can be adapted into compelling modern-day stories. The second Universal movie is the highly controversial film, The Hunt. Originally slated to release in Sept. 2019, the movie was pulled in the wake of the Dayton and El Paso shootings last year. The Hunt is a political satire and dark comedy about wealthy elite liberals who kidnap young adult conservatives to their ranch where they hunt them for sport. The Hunt made $5.3 million domestically, while receiving mixed reviews from both critics and audience members alike.

Here’s a look at how other movies still showing in theaters are performing:

Sonic the Hedgehog$145.7 million domestic total, $306.4 million worldwide total.

The Way Back$13.3 million domestic total, $14.3 million worldwide total.

The Call of the Wild$62 million domestic total, $107.2 million worldwide total.

Emma$9.9 million domestic total, $25 million worldwide total.

*Note: All financial data is provided courtesy The Numbers, my favorite source for box office data.

REVIEW: Onward

PIXAR
Rated: PG
Run Time: 103 minutes
Director: Dan Scanlon

Pixar lives in its own caliber of animated films because they have such a way of telling unique and heartwarming stories. They stay true to this claim once again with their latest tale, Onward. It ticks the following boxes: a buddy comedy, superhero origin story, and fantasy adventure. As always, the animation is incredible. From a scene where the viewer gets to see dust animated in such a way that has you thinking, “Wow, I didn’t know dust floating could be so entrancing,” to the details in facial expressions where a character’s slightest facial movements have you feeling exactly what they’re feeling.

In Onward, two brothers—Barley (voiced by Chris Pratt) and Ian (voiced by Tom Holland)—go on a quest across their land to bring their father back from the dead for one day. They follow clues, go to dangerous places, have hiccups along the way, and get into brotherly tiffs. This aspect of the film gave me major Goonies vibes, in the best way. What could have easily been predictable was elevated by humor, great world-building, and subtle callbacks throughout the film. My one critique is the musical score. Michael and Jeff Denna (who also composed the music for The Good Dinosaur) tried to create an 80’s-rock vibe for this soundtrack, and for me, it didn’t leave me in awe. Most Pixar movies have soundtracks that immediately stand out while watching the film, but that was not the case for Onward. The music was definitely not bad, it was just simply missing that little something extra that makes Pixar scores so special. 

While the basic plot was familiar (two youngsters going on a dangerous journey following clues in search of something magical) the world in which the story took place was unique. Sure, it has familiar fantastical elements—manticore, elves, unicorns, wizards—but the way the creator put his modern twist on the fantasy made it so much fun to watch. For example, Barley plays a game similar to Dungeons & Dragons, which was such a fun and nostalgic element to the world. Additionally, the B characters, Barley and Ian’s mom (voiced by Julia Louis-Dreyfus) and The Manticore (voiced by Octavia Spencer) added to the story in a comical way. Their characters helped make this film well-rounded and relatable to women and parents. Lastly, the way magic is portrayed as something you have to work really hard to master, was great. I loved the way it felt like when a superhero is first learning to control their powers; and when they finally are able to use them in awesome ways, it is so satisfying as a viewer.

Ian and Barley Lightfoot (voiced by Tom Holland and Chris Pratt respectively) in a scene of Onward | PIXAR

In all, Onward is an original story with such a fresh feel to it. The ending will have you surprised, with your insides feeling all warm and fuzzy inside, as they should after watching a Pixar film. Other classic Pixar elements in the movie are the “Easter Eggs” and callbacks. Not only does it reference other Disney/Pixar films in exciting and subtle ways, but also has some callbacks to small things throughout the film. I can’t wait to see it again to discover more of these special moments that make the viewing experience a unique one with each new watch.

Recommendation: GO SEE IT!

BOX OFFICE BULLETIN: ‘Onward’ and Upward

Ian and Barley Lightfoot (voiced by Tom Holland and Chris Pratt, respectively) in Onward | PIXAR

Pixar’s Onward claims the top spot in this weekend’s box office totals. Including its Thursday night previews, Onward grossed over $40 million domestically over its initial three-day weekend, which might seem like a very good haul for an animated feature film… But everything in context. Pixar Animation Studios has built a reputation for some of the most popular animated movies of all time. The last Pixar movie to gross under $50 million domestically in its opening weekend was Ratatouille in 2007. Including the international box office, Onward grossed approximately $68 million in its first three days. To put things into perspective, the last two Pixar feature films, Toy Story 4 (2019), and Incredibles 2 (2018) grossed $120 million and $182 million, respectively, in their opening weekends. Out of Pixar’s 23 animated feature films, Onward sits at 18th in opening weekend numbers. The film is receiving mostly positive reviews from critics (I personally highly recommend seeing Onward), and audiences seem to be really enjoying the movie as well. CinemaScore awarded Onward an A-, while the audience approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes currently sits at 96% with over 3,750 reviews at the time of this article.

So what happened? Don’t be surprised when the answer might be something as simple as the Coronavirus (even though the Coronavirus issue is anything but simple). Onward did not have the support of international audiences like most other Pixar films. The movie did not debut in any region of the world that is currently being impacted by the Coronavirus—including one of the biggest international box offices, China. In 2019, Toy Story 4 enjoyed a box office bump of over $13.2 million from China in its opening weekend. Expect this to be a trend as more movies continue to release this year. Some studios are trying to avoid these box office disappointments by delaying their releases (see: James Bond, and My Spy), hoping for things to settle down globally concerning the Coronavirus.

Elizabeth Moss in a scene of The Invisible Man | Universal Pictures

Universal’s The Invisible Man dropped 46% from its opening weekend, but still managed to take second place over newcomers The Way Back and Emma. In its second weekend, The Invisible Man brought in an additional $15 million domestically, bringing its global total to $98 million. Undoubtedly an impressive feat seeing the movie’s production budget was a mere $7 million. This is a huge success for Universal Pictures and their abandoned franchise (Dark Universe) that, like the phoenix, has somehow been reborn and risen from the ashes of The Mummy (2017). Director Leigh Whannell has proven that ‘Universal’s Classic Monsters’ do not need the star power of Tom Cruise nor the production budget of a Marvel superhero movie to succeed. The more grounded and intimate character driven approach of The Invisible Man will hopefully help steer the direction of the upcoming ‘Classic Monster’ movie reboots in Dark Army, and Frankenstein.

Jack Cunningham (Ben Affleck) coaches his high school basketball team in a scene of The Way Back | Warner Bros.

Rounding out the Top 3 is Warner Bros. The Way Back. Ben Affleck returns to the big screen after two previous roles in Netflix original movies, The Last Thing He Wanted (2020) and Triple Frontier (2019). The Way Back grossed just over $8.5 million domestically. Even though Ben Affleck has the star name and star talent to go along with this movie, it seems as though Warner Bros. wasn’t too concerned with spending resources in marketing this movie more to the public, and that’s a shame. In recent interviews, Affleck has opened up and shared intimate details of his life and his personal struggles over the last few years, and how much this film meant to him personally. Affleck most certainly cared about this movie; it would have been nice to feel as though Warner Bros. cared about it too.

Number 4 on this weekend’s top box office numbers was Paramount’s Sonic the Hedgehog, which grossed just under $8 million in its fourth weekend. Its global total now sits at $295 million (not including China, Japan etc.). Number 5 is 20th Century Studios’ The Call of the Wild with $7 million domestically. The Harrison Ford starred movie unfortunately is set to lose the studio over $50 million. Like some of the aforementioned movies in today’s bulletin, marketing and global health concerns have played major factors in this movie’s financial failures.

Here’s a look at how other movies still showing in theaters are performing:

Emma$5 million domestically, $6.8 million worldwide total (Emma just debuted in its first weekend)

Bad Boys For Life$202 million domestically, $415 million worldwide total.

Birds of Prey$82 million domestically, $195 million worldwide total.

Brahms: The Boy II$11.7 million domestically, $18.1 million worldwide total.

Portrait of a Lady on Fire$3.3 million domestically, $8.8 million worldwide total.

*Note: All financial data is provided courtesy The Numbers, my favorite source for box office data.

Top 7 Most Heart-Wrenching PIXAR Moments

Scenes from PIXAR movies through the years.

With Onward’s upcoming release, and the buzz around it sayingthat it will leave you in tears, I rewatched some of the most heart-wrenching Pixar moments and ranked them. The criteria was: how many tears were shed, how long did I cry for, and the intensity of the tightness in my chest. I also took into account how I felt when I watched each moment for the first time, and the lasting effect each has had (There will be SPOILERS if you haven’t seen these movies yet).

Andy, from Tory Story 3, saying goodbye to his old friend, Woody. | PIXAR

7. Toy Story 3 – “Thanks, guys”

MOMENT: Andy pulls up to Bonnie’s house with his boxes marked “College” in his trunk. He grabs a box marked “Attic” from his car and walks over to give Bonnie the box containing his childhood toys. He goes through introducing Bonnie to each toy—from Jessie to the three aliens. Lastly, he pulls out Buzz Lightyear, pointing out his features. Bonnie looks inside the box and sees Woody and says “My cowboy!” to which Andy asks, “What’s he doing in there?” He is apprehensive before finally giving Woody to Bonnie along with the rest of the toys. Andy then gets into one last play session with Bonnie (the new owner) and all of his old toys. Afterwards, Andy gets back in his car to leave, waves goodbye to Woody and Buzz with a final, “Thanks, guys.”

WHY IT’S SO HEART-WRENCHING: This moment falls on the list mainly for nostalgic reasons. I remember being a senior in high school when Toy Story 3 came out, so when Andy gives away his toys and is heading off to college (the next chapter in his life) I could relate. The moment holds up as a heart-wrenching one because it symbolizes growing up but still not growing old by watching Andy getting in one last playtime with his old gang of toys, whom we all grew up with, too.

Sully (voiced by John Goodman) says goodbye to Boo in Monsters Inc. | PIXAR

6. Monsters Inc. – “Kitty has to go”

MOMENT: Mike says “Go, go grow up now,” as Sully walks with Boo into her room. Boo is so excited, giggling and showing Sully all of her toys in her room. Sully tucks Boo in bed and she puts her tiny little hand on his arm and says “Kitty.” In which he replies, “Kitty has to go.” After hugging goodbye, Sully leaves through her closet door. Boo gets out of bed and excitedly hops over to the closet door. She opens it and says “Boo!” expecting Kitty to be there… Just to see her bedroom closet was back to normal.

WHY IT’S SO HEART-WRENCHING: This moment ranked on my list because Sully is so in love with Boo throughout the film, so when he has to say goodbye to her, it’s just so sad. The second Boo puts her tiny hand on his arm and says “Kitty” in that pitiful little kid voice, I’m done for. Additionally, the endless hope of children is represented when she goes to open the closet door and expects to see Sully there and is faced with disappointment. That moment just breaks my heart.

Marlin discovers one survivor after an attack in Finding Nemo. | PIXAR

5. Finding Nemo – “Daddy’s got you”

MOMENT: Marlin and his wife, Coral, are admiring their new home at the edge of the Drop Off. Marlin is so excited and Coral is doubting their choice because there is so much open space. It is then revealed that they’ve got all of their eggs in a tucked-away space below their anemone. Coral says that she likes the name “Nemo” for one of their 400 eggs. They begin laughing and playing when Coral shoots out of the anemone (with Marlin after her) , to reveal a terrifyingly empty reef. Coral is frozen staring at a barracuda who is looking right at her. She dives down to protect their eggs and Marlin attempts to stop her, getting knocked out in the process. The scene cuts to Marlin finding that Coral is gone, along with what appears to be all of their eggs. Marlin is in despair, when he finds one surviving egg. “Daddy’s got you. I promise I will never let anything happen to you, Nemo,” he says as he cradles the egg in his fins. 

WHY IT’S SO HEART-WRENCHING: This moment is so heart-wrenching because Pixar spent the first three minutes of the film making the viewer invest in this adorable clownfish couple who are so excited to be parents. Then they rip that story out from under you in a crushing reveal of the barracuda on the edge of the reef. When Marlin covers his eyes in despair and denial to then see one lone egg, you’re hit with another swift kick to the gut when he holds the egg and names it Nemo, in honor of Coral. It’s also on this list because of the musical score that comes in right before Marlin discovers Nemo. Every time I hear the first notes of Thomas Newman’s “Nemo Egg,” it puts me on the verge of tears.

Miguel (voiced by Anthony Gonzalez) sings to Mama Coco in Coco. | PIXAR

4. Coco – “Remember me”

MOMENT: Miguel has just discovered the truth about his family and Mama Coco’s papa. He works so hard to get back to her and reveals that if Coco forgets about her papa, Hector, he’ll be gone forever. Miguel shows her the photograph with desperate tears in his eyes. His parents and grandma bust in the room, scolding Miguel for what they think has distressed Mama Coco. Rather than apologizing, he picks up Hector’s guitar and begins to sing “Remember Me.” Coco begins to liven up and sing the song with Miguel. The rest of the family is awestruck watching the two sing together. Coco smiles and tells her family about how her Papa used to sing her that song. The entire family is left with tears in their eyes.

WHY IT’S SO HEART-WRENCHING: When Miguel plays the first three notes of “Remember Me,” I’m already in a mess of tears and snot. This moment is not only on the list because of the song, but also because of how it represents a family bonding over a lost story of their ancestry. It shows so beautifully how important it is to celebrate families differences and never forget the ones who came before us. As the song that follows this scene states, “Our love for each other will live on forever.” 

Carl reminisces about the past and his Ellie in Up. | PIXAR

3. Up – “Paradise Falls”

MOMENT: The moment really begins for me when Carl and Ellie get married and Carl is carrying Ellie into the old house where they first met. Their love story is told through a series of heartwarming snippets of their life together. The moment takes its first turn when a scene of them decorating a nursery is followed by a scene with them in a fertility office where Ellie is crying, holding her face in her hands. It picks back up as they save money for a trip to Paradise Falls. The montage continues through years of Ellie straightening Carl’s tie, both cleaning the house, and going to work together. Carl buys a ticket to South America, takes Ellie to their spot (where they always watch the sky) to surprise her, but Ellie can’t make it and falls on their walk up… Ellie’s now in the hospital and Carl sends her a blue balloon, just as he did when they were kids. The scene cuts to Carl holding the blue balloon in an empty funeral, then on his porch, and finally walking into their home, alone.

WHY IT’S SO HEART-WRENCHING: I feel like this moment does not need an explanation for why it’s so heart-wrenching, but here I’ll explain why it hits hard for me. I remember vividly watching this movie in theaters with my little brother. I was 16 and he was 10 at the time. I remember being so surprised that we just witnessed an entire epic love story told in the course of 11 minutes. We both were crying at the end of this moment and looked at each other with tear-stained cheeks. Our relationship grew stronger that day, being able to share such a special moment together. I think that I aspired to have what Carl and Ellie had: a love story so simple with traditions, like the blue balloon and Grape Soda pin. I feel lucky now, at 26 to say that I am lucky to have that Carl and Ellie type of love, which is why I now cry throughout the entire first 11 minutes of Up, not just the moment when Ellie passes. 

Merida (voiced by Kelly Macdonald) is embraced by her mother in Brave. | PIXAR

2. Brave – “I just want you back”

MOMENT: The time is running out for Merida to figure out how to turn her mother from a bear back into a human. The sun is rising on the second day and she thinks she has it figured out when she repairs the tapestry she damaged. She drapes the tapestry over Eleanor’s back in hopes that will change her into a human once again. As the sun rises, it dawns on her that her mother has changed into “full bear” when the human likeness in her eyes fades to black. She begins to sob and says, “You’ve always been there for me. You’ve never given up on me. I just want you back.” While still crying, and clinging to her mother, the sun continues to rise. The scene pulls back to reveal that Eleanor is, once again, human. Merida is overcome with joy and says, “You changed!” To which Eleanor replies, “Oh, darling, we both have.”

WHY IT’S SO HEART-WRENCHING: This moment makes it on the list because I can relate to Merida and her mother’s relationship—one in which there are clear differences in personalities, aspirations, and beliefs. I think a lot of people can relate to not always seeing eye-to-eye with their parents, so when the two characters change their outlook to one of acceptance rather than trying to change the other, it truly does tug at my heartstrings. In rewatching this scene, tears were most definitely shed.

Bing Bong (voiced by Richard Kind) says goodbye in Inside Out. | PIXAR

1. Inside Out – “Take her to the moon for me”

MOMENT: Joy and Bing Bong are stuck down in the memory dump, when Joy realizes they can try to use Bing Bong’s rocket to launch themselves out of there to get back to their mission of helping Riley. They sing Bing Bong’s song in an attempt to launch themselves out of the pit twice, coming up short each time. Bing Bong convinces Joy to try one more time. Before the rocket launches off the ramp, Bing Bong jumps out and stays in the memory dump. Joy makes it out and looks back down at Bing Bong as he is fading away. His last words are, “Take her to the moon for me, okay?” before he disappears, symbolizing being completely forgotten by Riley.

WHY IT’S SO HEART-WRENCHING: The way this entire movie so wonderfully reflects what it is like to grow out of being a child and into a teen is unbelievably well-done. So when this moment occurs three-quarters of the way through the film, I’m left feeling like a preteen all over again: insecure, a little hopeless, and confused. Bing Bong represented Riley’s childlike imagination and the carefree state of what it’s like to be a kid. Therefore, when Bing Bong disappears and is forgotten by Riley, my heart is literally aching. In addition, Bing Bong sacrifices himself, unbeknownst to Joy, so that she can make it out of the memory dump and continue to bring balance back into Riley’s emotions. It’s such a beautiful and deeply sad moment that will bring me to tears just thinking about it.

It was so hard to narrow down a list like this with so many heart-wrenching moments to choose from in Pixar’s vast lineup. I would love to know what your top heart-wrenching moments are in Pixar! Post them in the comments below.

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